Half Mandrill, Half Mandela

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wehadfacesthen:

Marlene Dietrich, 1942

Hat.

wehadfacesthen:

Marlene Dietrich, 1942

Hat.

nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

One of my favorite movies. I had no idea.

nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

One of my favorite movies. I had no idea.

my-ear-trumpet:

ladyattercop:

"A Fair Acrobat Soundly Thrashes A Man" (1898). He threatened her father; she "boxed [him] well about the head." -via Bob Nicholson

https://twitter.com/DigiVictorian/status/487610512830521344

my-ear-trumpet:

ladyattercop:

"A Fair Acrobat Soundly Thrashes A Man" (1898). He threatened her father; she "boxed [him] well about the head." -via Bob Nicholson

https://twitter.com/DigiVictorian/status/487610512830521344

putthison:

How Clothes Can Affect the Way People Treat You
NPR has an interesting story about how some African-Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.
"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."
So he went back in 1947, with a plan.
Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.
One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.
And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.
At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”
"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.
[…]
"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."
Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

putthison:

How Clothes Can Affect the Way People Treat You

NPR has an interesting story about how some African-Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.

"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."

So he went back in 1947, with a plan.

Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.

One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.

And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.

At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”

"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.

[…]

"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."

Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

I don’t know. We found it in my mom’s closet.

I don’t know. We found it in my mom’s closet.

oldbookillustrations:

Aschemon the dragon.

Walter Crane, from Beauty’s awakening, a masque of winter and of spring, by the  Art Workers Guild, London, 1899.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Aschemon the dragon.

Walter Crane, from Beauty’s awakening, a masque of winter and of spring, by the Art Workers Guild, London, 1899.

(Source: archive.org)

wehadfacesthen:

Orson Welles, 1939
via iznogoodgood

wehadfacesthen:

Orson Welles, 1939

via iznogoodgood

(Source: deforest)

The word “buccaneer” originated in a native people’s term for smokehouse, which the French pronounced boucan. The original buccaneers didn’t board ships and steal treasure, they were the jerky kings of the western hemisphere.

- Tom Reiss, The Black Count, page 36

Two questions:

Why is Ms. Marvel’s lightning bolt the same color as her flesh, making it the silliest of all boob windows?

Why does it show so many heroes and just say “BATTLE AS GAMBIT”?

Is this the ugliest game ever? (That’s three.)

Two questions:

Why is Ms. Marvel’s lightning bolt the same color as her flesh, making it the silliest of all boob windows?

Why does it show so many heroes and just say “BATTLE AS GAMBIT”?

Is this the ugliest game ever? (That’s three.)

thebristolboard:

"Treacherous Waters," a pencil illustration by Alex Niño, 1995.

thebristolboard:

"Treacherous Waters," a pencil illustration by Alex Niño, 1995.

If I had a car, this is how I would present it to people.

And it’s a Volvo, too.

If I had a car, this is how I would present it to people.

And it’s a Volvo, too.

“How come all the motherfuckers from Toronto up here with slum gold, that fake gold, that fake bullshit?”

I often like to imagine how much fun Scott La Rock would have been to keep watching, how he might’ve changed the rap game as an early entrepreneur, and how his not dying young might have shaped KRS-One’s career. There’s so little to go on, but what’s there is great.

There’s another video from the same show over at Ego Trip, where Scott and Biz Markie are interviewed, and Scott talks about how little the Bridge Wars actually mean (also an interview with the ’80s rap fan version of Rick Moranis).

Last song for today (maybe). A Jill Scott performance always makes me happy, but I’m not quite sure how much I do or don’t like this one yet…

Summer song.

I feel like this song (by a producer named Tittsworth, hee hee) is riding its Q-Tip feature a little too hard into early Native Tongues mode, back when they did slightly clubby dance songs too. Buuuuut I guess that works on me.